Month: July 2018

Practices facing tough penalties for MBS abuse

A recent headline in the Australian Doctor may set some alarm bells ringing “Corporates face tough new laws for MBS abuse”. Legislation just passed by the Federal Government means that, from July next year, where a practitioner has been found guilty of inappropriate billing, the practice not just the practitioner will have to refund the money to Medicare. This

Continue reading

How to opt out of the Government’s national electronic health record now

Seriously how safe will your personal health records be? The Australian Government announced in 2017  the creation of a My Health Record for every Australian to have by the end of 2018. The ABC’s recent article My Health Record: Your questions answered on cybersecurity, police, and privacy boasts the now in trouble with Privacy Laws Health

Continue reading

Health Engine Patient Data scandal; what should you do next?

After a recent national patient data breaches headlines …. ‘Scandal-hit HealthEngine axes third party referrals, patient reviews’ ‘HealthEngine app announces ‘major changes’ after doctor and patient backlash’ This important article comes from an independent law firm Peripheral Blue.  Now is a good time to consider what you need to do. Even amidst the (almost daily)

Continue reading

Medicare Audit Anxiety is hurting patient care; High Court Challenge – Thank you Julian Burnside QC – complete this historic survey

Medical error is the third biggest cause of death, and the following is yet another systemic example. Source: Medical error the third biggest cause of death According to a research report published by the British Medical Journal Medicare billing practitioners receive very little if any billing education in Australia. The current system is legally and

Continue reading

What am I doing wrong? How does a practice keep up with practice overheads and continue to provide quality patient care?

The recent Medicare increase is equivalent to a wage earner receiving a 1.5% p.a. pay rise after a decade of pay freezes. Practices will either have to cut costs or work longer hours, risking burnout. On 1st July wages increase up to 3.5% but Medicare increases by less than 1.5% after a long freeze.  

Continue reading